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Attempt an effective quotation of the following passage, following the “‘Quote Sandwich’ Approach” described in the “Avoiding Plagiarism” reading in Module 1. Also be sure to include a citation.

Original Passage (from Derald Wing Sue’s “Racial Microagressions in Everyday Life,” published online in Psychology Today, Oct. 5, 2010):

Racial microaggressions are the brief and everyday slights, insults, indignities and denigrating messages sent to people of color by well-intentioned White people who are unaware of the hidden messages being communicated.

Question 63 pts
Attempt an effective and accurate paraphrase of the following passage, based on what you learned about paraphrases from our readings on plagiarism in Module 1. Also be sure to include a citation.

Original Passage (from Deborah Tannen’s “The Triumph of the Yell,” p. 534, published in the book Reading Rhetorically,in 2002):

More and more these days, journalists, politicians and academics treat public discourse as an argument–not in the sense of making an argument, but in the sense of having one, of having a fight.

When people have arguments in private life, they’re not trying to understand what the other person is saying. They’re listening for weaknesses in logic to leap on, points they can distort to make the other look bad. We all do this when we’re angry, but is it the best model for public intellectual interchange? This breakdown of the boundary between public and private is contributing to what I have come to think of as a culture of critique.

Question 73 pts
Attempt an effective and accurate paraphrase of the following passage, based on what you learned about paraphrases from our readings on plagiarism in Module 1. Also be sure to include a citation.

Original Passage (from Beth L. Bailey’s “Dating,” p. 194, published in the book Reading Critically, Writing Well,in 1999):

One day, the 1920s story goes, a young man asked a city girl if he might call on her. We know nothing else about the man or the girl–only that, when he arrived, she had her hat on. Not much of a story to us, but any American born before 1910 would have gotten the punch line. “She had her hat on”: those five words were rich in meaning to early twentieth century Americans. The hat signaled that she expected to leave the house. He came on a “call,” expecting to be received in her family’s parlor, to talk, to meet her mother, perhaps to have some refreshments or to listen to her play the piano. She expected a “date,” to be taken “out” somewhere and entertained.

In the early twentieth century this new style of courtship, dating, had begun to supplant the old. Born primarily of the limits and opportunities of urban life, dating had almost completely replaced the old system of calling by the mid-1920s–and, in doing so, had transformed American courtship.

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